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Ayurvedic Recipes: Broccoli

Ayurvedic Recipes: Broccoli with Peppers and Herbs

By Diana Bellofatto
April 3, 2018

Ayurvedic Recipes: Broccoli

 

What’s in your garden?

Spring is here, and what better way to celebrate than by reaping the benefits of an herb garden!

 

If you tend towards a vata tummy (gas/bloating) when it comes to broccoli, you’ll be happy to know that the warming herbs and ginger in this recipe will aid in digestion.

 

The herbs in this recipe have an affinity for helping to balance kapha (earth & water), which is abundant during spring. They are warming and stimulating, diaphoretic, nervine, and they improve memory and relieve depression, congestion, asthma, and insomnia.

 

You can enjoy plucking this mélange of herbs for the recipe if you do have an herb garden. It’s a great way to connect more deeply to your food and the earth. If you don’t have access to fresh herbs at this time, you may substitute about half the amount of dried herbs for this recipe.

 

Broccoli with peppers & herbs

  • 2 tablespoons ghee
  • 1/2 tablespoon minced ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh minced rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into strips
  • 5 cups broccoli florets
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • mineral salt to taste
  • black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons to 1 tablespoon of lemon or lime juice
  • * Optional – toss in toasted nuts or seeds at the end for added protein.

Directions

1. Heat the ghee in a pan. Add the rosemary and ginger and sauté over low heat until the ginger is soft and slightly browned. If you are using dried herbs, sauté them at this time as well.
2. Add the broccoli and bell pepper, sprinkle lightly with salt.
3. Stir, cover, and sauté on low to medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender. You can add a little bit of water to the vegetables if they start to stick to the pan.
4. Turn off the heat, stir in all of the other herbs. Add the lemon or lime juice.
5. Sprinkle with toasted nuts or seeds of your choice.

Serves 4 to 6. 

 
 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: Ayurvedic Recipes , broccoli , health , healthy diet , healthy eating , herbs
Ayurvedic Recipes - Sauteed Greens

Ayurvedic Recipes: Sauteed Greens

By Diana Bellofatto
February 22, 2018

Ayurvedic Recipes - Sauteed Greens

Ayurveda calls collard greens sattvic.  This implies that they support peacefulness and purity of body, mind, and spirit. Collard greens possess bitter, astringent, light, dry qualities.  Their digestion is aided with spices, healthy fats, and substances rich in digestive enzymes and stomach acid boosting abilities.

 

Enjoy collards as a side dish, a main dish with protein rich nuts, seeds, and beans or, in a soup. Read on to discover more about the greatness of these greens and the ingredients by which they are accompanied in February’s recipe.

The ‘personality traits’ of the ingredients

  • Collards Greens are packed with fiber and are an excellent source of antioxidants, vitamins A , C, E,  K, folic acid, iron, calcium, magnesium.  Their bitter taste aids in de-stagnation of the liver and enhances bile flow.
  • Tamari contains digestive enzymes and provides that “umami” taste.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar will give your stomach acid a boost and supports healthy blood sugar.
  • Ginger enkindles the digestion fire, keeps us warm, and detoxifies unhealthy fat from the body.
  • Ghee-the butyric acid in ghee nourishes the gut and provides a great source of healthy fat.
  • Pumpkin & Sunflower Seeds provide protein, are mineral rich and protect against free radicals.

Sauteed Greens with Pumpkin & Sunflower Seeds

  • 1 cup water
  • About 10 cups washed, dried, and chopped fresh collard greens
  • 2 teaspoons fresh chopped ginger
  • 1.5 tablespoon ghee
  • 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon tamari
  • 1/4 c. toasted sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 c. toasted pumpkin seeds

Directions

1. In a large deep skillet, on medium heat, sauté the ginger until soft and slightly golden.

2. Add the collard greens and mix well.

3. Add the water, cover and reduce the heat to low and cook until the collard greens are tender.

4. Turn off the heat and stir in the tamari and raw apple cider vinegar.

5. Transfer to serving bowl and stir in the sunflower and pumpkin seeds.

Serves 4

 
 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: art of living , art of living retreat center , Ayurveda , ayurveda cleanse , ayurveda detox , Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , cleanse , greens , sauteed greens , winter
Art of Living Retreat Center - Carrot Currant Salad

Ayurvedic Recipes: Carrot Currant Salad

By Diana Bellofatto
December 21, 2017

Art of Living Retreat Center - Carrot Currant Salad

 

Yes, carrots are good for the eyes and so much more!

This popular root vegetable has an interesting “personality”. Ayurveda tells us that substances with a sweet taste have a cooling energy. Although the carrot is mainly sweat in taste (rasa), it has heating energy (virya). This makes the carrot a great seasonal vegetable for winter.

 

Rich in Vitamin A and antioxidants, the carrot is a salad superhero and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Immune-boosting qualities, the ability to bring down blood pressure and protect the liver, act as a diuretic, improve appetite, and treat IBS, are just a few of it’s superpowers!

 

The other ingredients in this salad are great sidekicks that help this dish pack the perfect punch! They are nourishing, grounding, and unctuous, making this a welcoming, wonderfully warm winter recipe.

 

This is a raw salad that I suggest be warmed before eaten, or at least eaten at room temperature to aid in digestion.

 

Carrot Currant Salad

  • 1 cup of currants, raisins, or chopped dates
  • 3/4 cup warm water
  • 1 1/2 tbsp tahini
  • 3/4 tbsp maple syrup or jaggery
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1/8 – 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon, to taste
  • 3-4 cups grated or shredded carrots (about 4-6 medium carrots)
  • Optional: about 1/4 cup fine toasted coconut flakes for garnish
 

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, soak the currants, dates, or raisins in the warm water for five minutes. Drain and reserve 1/4 cup of the soak water.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together all the ingredients, except for the carrots and coconut.
  3. Stir in the carrots until coated well with the dressing.
  4. Warm before serving, and garnish with toasted coconut.

Serves four as a side dish.

 
 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , carrots , food , recipe , Recipes , salad , winter

Ayurvedic Recipes: Vata-Calming Butternut Squash Soup

By Diana Bellofatto
September 21, 2017

Ayurvedic Recipes - Butternut Squash Soup

Autumn is Vata season, with the earth beginning to dry out from the summer months and the cool breeze blowing in from the upcoming winter. As our bodies adjust to the season, we might find ourselves feeling dry, bloated, anxious, and unbalanced. Luckily, nature provides a wonderful remedy to these afflictions in the seasonal foods available to us. Root vegetables, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, and other in-season foods are naturally vata-calming.

This butternut squash soup is not only healing, but a delicious ode to the season as well.

 

Vata-Calming Butternut Squash Soup

  • 2 tbsp ghee
  • 1 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1 inch chunks
  • 1 medium sweet potato or 2 large carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 large garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 inch piece of fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 cup cococnut milk
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Minced parsley for garnish
 

Directions

  1. Melt 1 tbsp ghee in a large, deep saute pan. Add squash, sweet potato, and then onion. Saute, stirring very little at first, and then more frequently, for 7 or 8 minutes or until all ingredients turn golden brown.
  2. Reduce heat to low and add garlic. Continue cooking until vegetables a rich caramel color, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. In a separate soup pot, add 1 tbsp ghee, the ginger, and the rest of the spices except the turmeric. Saute until fragrant.
  4. Add water and vegetables to soup pot. Bring to a low boil over medium heat. Reduce to simmer for about 10 minutes, partially covered, until squash is tender.
  5. Puree in a blender or food processor until smooth.
  6. Return to soup pot. Pour in enough coconut milk so that the texture is smooth, thick, and hearty. Add salt and pepper to taste. Heat through, and garnish with parsley.

Serves 2-3.


 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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Ayurvedic Recipes: Indian Okra

By Diana Bellofatto
August 2, 2017

Summer is here, and you may be experiencing extreme temperatures and the imbalances that accompany the high heat. One of the most effective ways to regulate body temperature and bring one’s self back into balance is through diet.

Pitta is that which is governed, mainly, by the fire element, and responds well to sweet, astringent, and bitter tastes to bring it back into balance when overheated. Therefore, it would stand to reason that the hot summer is pitta season. We want to be careful not to add too much heat to this already fiery time of the year! Choosing the appropriate seasonal foods will help pacify pitta’s predilection for pyrogenic tendencies.

   

Indian Okra

  • 2 cups okra
  • 1 tbsp ginger grated
  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • ½ tsp cumin seeds
  • ½ tsp coriander powder
  • ¼  tsp turmeric
  • Salt (to taste)
  • ½ lime
  • Handful chopped cilantro (for garnish)

Directions

When preparing okra use dry cutting board and knife to avoid okra getting wet.  Heat ghee in pan until melted.  Add cumin seeds until they “swim.”  Reduce heat and add fresh ginger.  Add coriander powder and turmeric.  Combine okra with spice mixture and cook on low for 15 minutes or until tender.  Add salt to taste.  Garnish with a squeeze of lime and fresh cilantro.

     

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: art of living , Ayurveda , Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , dosha , food , health , healthy lifestyle , natural lifestyle , Recipes , salad , summer , weight-loss
Art of Living Retreat Center - Sail Through Summer

Wellness, Naturally: Sail Through Summer

By Diana Bellofatto
July 31, 2017

Art of Living Retreat Center - Sail Through Summer

 

Summer fun – lots of fresh air, sunshine, outdoor activities, and socializing abound, but unless we maintain balance, we may find our energy sapped and tapped from excesses when we over indulge or work hard out in the heat.

 

In spring and the onset of summer, we see lots of vibrantly colored, hearty plants and flowers. Having endured the heat, by August, we may notice that many of the plants and flowers lose their vibrancy and color and begin to wilt.

 

Mimicking what goes on in nature, we also begin to wilt in August if we have been going at it too hard at work and/or play. For many of us, the summer sun, heat and lack of discipline in daily routine take their toll and we start to notice dry, chalky skin, lack of energy, dehydration, irritability, and a need for a more steady daily routine that puts us in a good “head space” for making better choices.

 

Here are my tips for a sense of elevation, elation, and rejuvenation…

DIET

Continue to eat seasonally and favor sweet, bitter, and astringent tastes. Give special consideration to cherries, watermelon, pomegranate, and apples for their ability to activate heat removal, hydration and lymphatic flow in the body. Eating al fresco is great, just avoid being in direct sunlight and very hot temperatures. Minimize meat intake due to its heating and heavy nature and eat in a calm, relaxed environment whenever possible.

 

LIFESTYLE

Summer can be a very social time of year so, you may be fishing for a little down time at this point. Reel it in by not over scheduling yourself and plan some time for relaxing at home. It is said that music soothes the savage beast. You may want to add ocean sounds, whales, birds, and other soothing sounds to your playlist and enjoy those sounds at home, in the car, or at work if permissible.

 

YOGA

Beat the heat! Favor dissipation over perspiration with yoga. A supine, supported, restorative bound angle posture might be just what you need to cool your jets; along with some cooling breath work such as chandra bhedana, shitali or shitkari. Your yoga teacher can provide instruction.

 

SELF LOVE

Becoming overheated can induce irritability, a judgmental nature, an overall negative attitude and feelings of inadequacy. We can be hard on others but even harder on ourselves. Come in for a landing, sit down, close your eyes, take some deep breaths, scan your body to find areas of tension and restriction and give yourself permission to relax and let go. Finding the balance between “doing” and “being” is one of the most important practices we can have. Some of us tend to value doing over being. Remember, we are human beings- practice compassion for yourself and others.

 

HERBS

The wonderful wisdom of herbs can play a vital role in, what Ayurveda calls rasayana, or rejuvenation. One of the top herbs for this time of year is amalaki. Consult with an Ayurvedic practitioner for the protocol that is right for you, as it is important for your health history to be taken into consideration when herbs are recommended.

 

The methods of rasayana provided by diet, lifestyle, yoga, herbs and compassion for one’s self and others rejuvenate the cytoplasm and protein of plasma, kindle the digestive fire, maintain tone of the tissues, enhance the life span of cells, cellular memory and cellular intelligence, promote normal, healthy psychological function, a melodious voice, strength and stamina, and bring functional synchronicity to the organs. There are rasayana methods for each of the 7 tissues (plasma, blood, muscle, bone, fat, nervous & reproductive tissue) that can greatly improve quality of life.

   

Interested in learning more about the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here! 

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TAGS: art of living , art of living retreat center , August , Ayurveda , Ayurveda 101 , Ayurvedic diet , diet , happiness , healthy lifestyle , herbs , lifestyle , rasayana , self love , summer , yoga

Ayurvedic Recipes: Sensational Summer Salad to the Rescue!

By Diana Bellofatto
July 3, 2017

Ayurvedic Recipes - Summer Salad

Summer is here, and you may be experiencing extreme temperatures and the imbalances that accompany the high heat. One of the most effective ways to regulate body temperature and bring one’s self back into balance is through diet.

Pitta is that which is governed, mainly, by the fire element, and responds well to sweet, astringent, and bitter tastes to bring it back into balance when overheated. Therefore, it would stand to reason that the hot summer is pitta season. We want to be careful not to add too much heat to this already fiery time of the year! Choosing the appropriate seasonal foods will help pacify pitta’s predilection for pyrogenic tendencies.

 

This light salad is a great way to honor your body’s nutritional needs without feeling too weighed down in the heat. See how the seasonal and light nature of this salad provides a tantalizing, tasty, and nutritionally balanced meal as each of the ingredients pave the way for pitta pacification.

(more…)

TAGS: art of living , Ayurveda , Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , dosha , food , health , healthy lifestyle , natural lifestyle , Recipes , salad , summer , weight-loss
Art of Living Retreat Center - Summer Ayurveda

Wellness, Naturally: Tips for Beating the Heat – Now That’s Cool!

By Diana Bellofatto
July 1, 2017

Art of Living Retreat Center - Summer Ayurveda

 

Have you ever noticed a shift in your mood and perception when the seasons change? For many of us, the heaviness of spring giving way to the lightness of summer brings with it a sense of lightness in body and mind.

 

Our day to day lifestyles and activities shift when kids get out of school or the company we work for changes to it’s “casual” Fridays or Fridays off policy. It stays light out so that we are able to enjoy time outside after work, the flowers and trees are bursting with color, and birds are chirping away. It’s no wonder that many of us look forward to the summer season and really thrive in it!

 

Luckily, that lightness of being helps to balance out the intensity of the heat in summer, but for some of us, that may not be enough. The summer heat can provoke skin eruptions (think rashes, hives, poison ivy), diarrhea, irritability, and a tendency to be too judgmental.

 

Riding the Heat Waves of Summer in Serenity

Follow seasonal eating guidelines. Bitter, astringent, and sweet flavors are cooling. Take advantage of the bodacious bounty of berries and other fruits available for their anti-inflammatory and cooling qualities.

 

Reduce your intake of meat at the barbecue as its acid qualities are heating. Instead, favor more beans for protein. Load up with liver lovin’ salads for their bitter yet benevolent benefits that promote detoxifying and destagnating/bile thinning effects. Spicy foods such as wasabi and hot chili peppers are, typically, not our friends at this time of year. Carefully explore how much of them you can eat without feeling too much heat. Continue to align with all things alkaline and you will be feeling fine & divine!

 

As the fire element pre-dominates in summer, we are aware of the need to stay hydrated so that we don’t burn out. Ayurveda, generally, recommends drinking half of one’s body weight in ounces per day. You can also add 8 ounces of water per hour of exercise or other activity that promotes perspiration.

 

Whenever possible, avoid exercising or working outside in the intensity of the midday sun. Walking “by the light of the silvery moon” is in favor at this time of year. Let go of heating, sharp, penetrating stares. Allow a diffusive gaze at La bella luna to invoke calming and cooling characteristics that transport you to a place of peacefulness.

 

Love the Skin You’re In

If you tend to suffer from skin eruptions, following the aforementioned guidelines can help to mitigate the effects of the heat or even prevent skin eruptions from occurring at all. Massaging the feet with coconut oil at bedtime is super self care for keeping cool. The following are a few additional remedies for common summer complaints:

 

More Summer Remedies

Hot Flashes
Hot flash ‘cocktail’ consists of 1 c. pomegranate juice or 2 tbs. pomegranate concentrate ‘syrup’ with 1 cup water, 1 tsp. natural sugar, 5 to 10 drops lime juice up to twice per day.

 

Poison Ivy/Hives/Bug bites/Rashes

Blend a bunch of fresh cilantro with about 1/3 cup of water. Drink the juice and apply the remaining pulp to the affected area.

 

Apply fresh coconut water to the affected area.

 

Melons soothe the skin too. Eat the melon and rub the rind (not the skin) on the affected area. If you eat watermelon, eat the red part and apply the white part to the skin.

 

Steep 1/2 tsp. cumin and 1 tsp. natural sugar in 1 cup hot milk for about 5 minutes. Drink up to twice per day.

 

Mix together 1tbs. coriander, 1 tbs. cumin, and 2 tbs. natural sugar. Steep 1/2 tsp of the mixture in a cup of hot milk for about 5 minutes. Drink up to twice per day until skin is healed.

 

Summer Yoga

Avoid being “hot headed” and sleep deprived with gentle, cooling, calming forward bends, as well as shitali and shitkari pranayama (breath work). Consult with your yoga teacher for a demonstration.

 

May these recommendations find you floating away on a pool of infinite wellness.

   

Interested in learning more about programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here.

 

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TAGS: art of living , art of living retreat center , Ayurveda , Ayurvedic diet , healthy lifestyle , heat , summer , wellness , wisdom , yoga

Wellness, Naturally: No April Fools Here!

By Diana Bellofatto
April 1, 2017

Ayurveda - Spring
Spring is here, and as the saying goes, “We got this!” Practicing Ayurveda gives us an edge over imbalances that might otherwise sneak up on us, as long as we practice awareness with the right diet and lifestyle.

We surfed through March, riding the wave of fluctuating temperatures and unpredictable weather. The test of our ability to shift on the fly and make appropriate food choices, while on the cusp of spring, really kept us on our toes.

Now, spring weather conditions are consistently here. We can transition from the more acidic, heavy diet that kept us balanced in winter to a diet more high in alkaline, light qualities. This will help ensure smooth sailing into spring.

One of the most beautiful aspects of Ayurveda is that there is no need to memorize a lot of information. Common sense and an organic approach of following the lead of Mother Nature guides us as she serves up spring’s verdant variety of chlorophyll rich (alkaline) foods that aid in transformation from the acid to alkaline state.

Here are my favourite spring seasonal eating lifestyle tips!

 

Honor Your Agni with Ginger

Encourage strong digestion with ginger tea. Ayurveda has a saying – “honor your agni” – because good health or dis-ease is predicated upon the strength of one’s agni, or digestive fire. When agni is weak, we experience imbalances, and when it is strong, we feel well. This is one of the main tenets of Ayurveda.

Ginger is heating in nature, and so, helps kindle agni. Ginger aids in stimulating the appetite, improves digestion and assimilation of nutrients, provides an analgesic effect for joint pain, and facilitates the clearing of wastes from the body. Generally speaking, ginger can be used every day.

Those with hyperacidity should introduce ginger into their diet slowly and with guidance from their health care practitioner. A tablespoon of fresh chopped ginger brought to a boil in 8 to 12 ounces of water, simmered for about 10 minutes, and accompanied by the juice of half a lemon can do wonders! Dried ginger in a tea bag is effective as well.

Protect Yourself with Chlorophyll

The many delicious green vegetables that color our plates in spring contain chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is a plant pigment responsible for the many disease-fighting and detoxification properties of fresh greens. Because it slows the rate at which harmful bacteria can reproduce, it is a potent wound healer. It’s anti-viral effects protect the skin from viruses like herpes, that cause cold sores, shingles, etc.

Since cancer cells thrive in an acidic environment, chlorophyll is a boon for cancer prevention. Chlorophyll cleanses and detoxifies the liver by inhibiting the ability for certain chemicals to metabolize and cause cell damage. It also increases the activity of enzymes that protect healthy cells. Chlorophyll is the superhero you want on your side!

 

Snack on Spirulina

This is one of my favorite recipes for a spring snack – chlorophyll-filled, protein-packed Spirulina (blue-green algae) power balls! They’re no-bake and easy to make.

1/2 c. softened coconut oil
1/3 c. raw honey
1/2 tsp. mineral salt
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2 tbsp. spirulina powder (or, up to 1/4 cup)
3/4 c. white or black sesame seeds or pumpkin seeds, ground
1/2 c. hemp, chia, or sunflower seeds, ground
*Optional – toasted coconut flakes or raw cacao powder in which to roll the balls.

1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix well.
2. Refrigerate mixture for at least 30 minutes, or up to an hour, so that the balls stay formed when you roll them.
3. Roll into bite-sized balls, and then roll in coconut or cacao.
4. Store in the fridge, eat and room temperature for best flavor and digestion.

Check out one of our spring Ayurveda retreats for a full immersion experience!

Interested in learning more about programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here.

 

Yoga Retreat Catalog for NC

TAGS: agni , art of living , art of living retreat center , Ayurveda , Ayurveda 101 , Ayurvedic diet , cleanse , Detox , dosha , food , health , seasonal eating , Spring , wellness naturally
Spring Cleansing

Wellness, Naturally: Spring Cleansing

By Diana Bellofatto
March 20, 2017

Spring Cleansing

 

We hear so much about cleansing these days. There are many ways to cleanse, and it seems like everybody is doing it! It’s all over the internet, and even celebrities are touting the benefits. If done correctly, cleansing has some phenomenal benefits. If done incorrectly, not only will the therapeutic value be lost, but imbalances can be driven more deeply into the body.

 

On a deeper level, be aware that cleansing is not just beneficial for the physical body. I can’t emphasize that enough! While the physical body benefits greatly from a cleanse, there are also amazing mental and spiritual benefits to be experienced. Each time we cleanse, the process goes a bit deeper.

 

Spring is the perfect time to embark on an Ayurvedic cleanse – and here are five reasons why.

 

Acid vs. Alkaline

In winter, we follow nature’s lead and eat seasonally, to benefit from a more acidic diet that helps us stay warm and grounded. In spring, it is important to rid ourselves of that acidity and become more alkaline. This will ensure that we don’t suffer heat imbalances as we move into summer.

 

The Opportunity for Release

We have an opportunity to process molecules of emotion stored in the fat cells during a cleanse. Cleansing allows us to release “old” thoughts and feelings that no longer serve us. As a result, we are more inclined to move away from negative behavior patterns that we repeat. We’re also more likely to open up to trying something new to achieve our desired results.

 

A Return to Emotional Balance

As the acronym SAD (for Seasonal Affective Disorder) suggests, winter is a time where we can suffer from depression and general feelings of malaise. Some people feel a spring in their step as winter thaws, but some of us experience feelings of heaviness in the body, heart, and mind, weighing us down when it rains and the snow melts in spring. The protocol of eating a lighter diet and walking in nature during the cleanse supports our ability to come back to a state of equanimity.

 

Setting up for Success

The strength of our digestion waxes and wanes throughout the year. Many of us can’t wait for the abundant buffet of delicious vegetables that come up through the earth’s floor in spring and summer. Along with that comes the opportunity to eat more salads, and other cold, raw vegetables. This will require a strong digestive fire and one of the benefits of the spring cleanse is that it resets the digestive fire to support our change in eating habits.

 

Strengthened Immunity

With a strengthened digestive fire, comes strengthened immunity that enhances our ability to thwart imbalances, such as severe allergies and sinus infections that often accompany spring. So cleansing in spring will find us out of the doctor’s office and in a place of ease and comfort, enjoying life!

 

Learn more about our Ayurvedic Detox Retreats here! 

Interested in learning more about programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here.

 

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