Ayurveda Farro Bowl

Farro, Mushroom, & Walnut Bowl

By Diana Bellofatto
October 24, 2018

Ayurveda Farro Bowl

Featuring farro for winter warmth

As we head into winter (Vata season), the elements of air and space become more abundant. Vata’s qualities are cold, light, dry, rough, mobile, and erratic. Applying the opposite qualities offers support for staying in balance throughout the winter season. Therefore, you may find yourself in need of heavier, more warming, and grounding foods.

 

If meat is not on your menu, “old world” or “ancient” grains, such as farro, are a good staple to have in your pantry. Farro is known for its high fiber, zinc, B vitamins, iron, and impressive amount of protein.

 

Soaking grains before cooking them is always important to re-hydrate the grain from its dry state. This reduces gas/bloating and improves the nutritional bio-availability by removing anti-nutrients that inhibit optimal digestion and assimilation of nutrients.

 

In Ayurveda, there are three qualities (Sattva, Rajas, Tamas) known as the gunas. The tamasic quality tends toward inertia, darkness, and heaviness. Mushrooms possess tamasic qualities because they grow in the dark, with an inward and downward flow of energy. Medicinally speaking, mushrooms stimulate immunity, are nervine and grounding to alleviate anxiety and promote sound sleep, as well as bolster bone/joint health. This is a huge bonus at a time of year where many of us may suffer from insomnia, aching bones/joints, and colds or flus. “Boning” up on these foods now will help thwart imbalances later on in the season as we insulate and arm ourselves just prior to the height of winter.

 

The walnut takes credit for being known to build stamina. Shaped like a brain, it is also a tonic for the brain and ojas (think strength, immunity, life sap) enhancer. With a slightly bitter taste and crunchiness, it pairs well with farro and mushrooms for a nicely varied flavor and texture profile.

 

Farro, mushroom, & walnut bowl

  • 1 cup farro, soaked for 8 hours and rinsed
  • 1.5 cups thinly sliced cremini or button mushrooms
  • 1 cup chopped yellow onion
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, lightly toasted
  • Himalayan pink salt & black pepper to taste
  • Ghee for sautéing
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
 

Directions

1. In a medium-sized pot, sauté the onions until translucent.

2. Add the mushrooms and sauté until their water evaporates and they become more firm and slightly brown.

3. Add the farro, oregano, thyme, salt, pepper, and vegetable broth and bring to a boil.

4. Turn down to simmer and cook for about 30 minutes with the lid on, until the water has evaporated.

5. Remove from heat, transfer to serving bowl, and garnish with walnuts.

Serves 4. 

 

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TAGS: Ayurveda , Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , diet , farro , gourmet food , organic food , Recipes , weight-loss
Thyme Ayurveda Bowl

Shallot, Fennel, Thyme & Quinoa Bowl

By Diana Bellofatto
September 26, 2018

Thyme Ayurveda Bowl

“Thyme” for the seasons to shift

Eating seasonally is very important, and there are still plenty of delicious herbs and vegetables coming in fresh at this time of year. Take advantage of the deliciousness before “thyme” runs out, and the selection of herbs and vegetables diminish in winter.

 

A pungent herb, thyme is beneficial to pacify overabundant vata (space & air) and kapha (water & earth) qualities that can result in intestinal distress symptoms such as gas, bloating, or nausea. Thyme can increase pitta (fire) qualities due to its heating nature. So, if it is very warm where you live or you are experiencing a pitta imbalance, use it more sparingly or substitute fresh cilantro for it. Thyme is wonderfully aromatic and infuses this dish with a flavor that pays compliments to its culinary counterparts.

 

The shallot belongs to the allium family. It imparts a more refined, yet onion like flavor. Shallots are grounding, so they balance out the stimulating effect of thyme. Cooking shallots diffuses their heating nature and increases their sweetness.

 

You may know fennel as the vegetable with a mild licorice flavor. Sautéing or braising fennel softens the licorice flavor and brings out its sweetness. Fennel acts an amazing agni (digestive fire) enhancer without increasing heat in the body. It is diaphoretic and diuretic, so it can flush excess heat and fluid from the body. This comes in handy post-summer. Fennel is also known to help increase mental and visual clarity.

 

We tend to lump quinoa in with grains, but it is actually a seed. There are many varieties of quinoa, with the white, red, and black varieties being the most popular. You can often find all three mixed together, which reminds me of the three constitutional types of Ayurveda (Vata, Pitta, Kapha). Quinoa offers a protein punch and is tri-doshic (beneficial for Vata, Pitta, Kapha). If you tend to lean toward vata imbalances, be more generous with the amount of ghee you use in this recipe.

 

Shallot, fennel, thyme, & quinoa bowl

  • 1 cup quinoa, soaked in water overnight and rinsed
  • 3 large shallots, chopped
  • 1 bulb of fennel, thinly sliced (reverse the wisp-like dark green fronds for garnish!)
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 1 carrot, grated
  • Ghee for sautéing
  • Pink Himalayan salt & white pepper to taste
  • Generous handful of freshly-chopped cilantro leaves
 

Directions

1. In a medium-sized pot, sauté the shallots in ghee for a few minutes, until clear or slightly browned.

2. Add the fennel and sauté until soft.

3. Add the carrot, quinoa, salt, pepper, and about 2 cups of water, and bring to a boil. Turn down to simmer and cover.

4. Cook about 15 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed.

5. Remove from heat, transfer to serving dish, and garnish with cilantro and fennel fronds.

Serves 4. 

 

Interested in incorporating vibrant, delicious Ayurvedic cooking into your health and wellness goals? Check out the Ayurveda Culinary Retreat, hosted by renowned Ayurvedic chef Nalini Mehta at the Art of Living Retreat Center from November 2-4, 2018!


Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: Ayurveda , Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , cleanse , diet , food , healthy lifestyle , recipe , weight-loss
Ayurvedic Recipes: Beet Kale Salad

Beet Apple Celery Kale (BACK) Salad

By Diana Bellofatto
August 29, 2018

Ayurvedic Recipes: Beet Kale Salad

Wow, some of us have experienced an intensely hot summer this year! The Ayurvedic way tells us to cleanse at the end of summer to rid ourselves of excess heat, and this salad is perfect for doing just that.

 

Excess heat can cause dryness in the body. In turn, the body responds by creating reactive mucous in order to lubricate itself. Mucous breeds bacteria that makes us sick. This response to dryness is one of the classic fall scenarios that lead to sinus infections, intense allergies, and more.

 

Beets contain B vitamins, calcium, iron, and have amazing antioxidants, too. The liver tends to harbor heat, and beets provide super support for the liver in its ability to release heat and function well.

 

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away…” How true it is! Apples have an affinity for scraping the body of ama (toxins) and heat with their pitta (fire) pacifying, astringent, and cooling qualities. Autumn’s apples are an ally for sure!

 

Celery stimulates the sweat glands to release heat, and reminds the lymph to move. It simultaneously scrapes mucous from the digestive tract as it aids in digestion and detoxification.

Another pitta-friendly pal, kale’s bitter quality cools as its fibrous nature aids in maintaining intestinal integrity.

 

This simple salad is a powerful panacea for fending off fall and winter woes and enabling you to take “BACK” your balance.

 

Beet, Apple, Celery, and Kale (BACK) Salad

  • 1 head kale, chopped (if you take this recipe further into fall, you can omit the kale)
  • 2 beets, grated
  • 2-3 stalks celery, chopped
  • 1 apple, chopped (the sweeter the apple, the more cooling it is. Try Gala, Honeycrisp, or Golden Delicious!)
  • Lemon or lime juice, to taste
  • Flax oil for drizzling
  • 1/2 to 1 cup cilantro leaves, or about 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tsp ground fennel
  • pinch of Himalayan pink sea salt (go easy on salt, as it tends to be heating!)
 

Directions

1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl.
2. Mix well with flax oil and citrus juice.
Eat this salad at midday for optimal digestion and assimilation of nutrients.

Serves 4. 

 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: apple , autumn , Ayurvedic Recipes , beet , celery , cooling , kale , pitta pacifying
Summer Ayurveda - Art of Living Retreat Center

Satisfying Cilantro Summer Sauce 2

By Diana Bellofatto
July 10, 2018

Summer Ayurveda - Art of Living Retreat Center

The hot time of year is upon us once again! Eating seasonally and staying cool will guide us toward lots of greens and veggies. This sauce makes the perfect partner to accompany your culinary creativity.

For the most part, nuts are heating, but almonds that have the skin removed are not. The skin of the almond is a tough substance to digest, and contains some anti-nutrients that are best removed. What remains is a protein-rich, ojas (think immune boosting & strengthening) enhancing, satisfying food.

In the world of Ayurveda, cilantro is known for it’s cooling effects and ability to cloy toxins from the body. It has an affinity for the skin and can even be made into a paste and applied to skin eruptions from rashes due to allergic reactions from poison ivy and the like.

Lime helps to impart the salty taste without creating excess heat, so you won’t have to add much salt to this sauce.

You can whip this sauce up in just a few minutes in a blender or food processor. Enjoy!

Fresh cilantro and almond sauce

If your agni (digestive fire) is up to the task of digesting raw veggies, this sauce can double as a dip for crudités or as salad dressing. Otherwise, it dresses cooked vegetables and grains very nicely.

  • 1/2 cup almonds, soaked over night in a bowl and peeled
  • About 1/2 cup water
  • 1 bunch fresh cilantro
  • 1/4-1/2 cup lime juice
  • About 3 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Pink Himalayan salt & black pepper to taste

Directions

1. Place soaked and peeled almonds in a blender with ½ c. water, lime juice, olive oil, pepper and salt. Puree.
2. Add cilantro (leaves & stems) and blend well.
3. Add more/less water and/or oil for desired consistency.
Store in the fridge for up to 48 hours.

Makes about one cup.

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TAGS: Ayurveda , Ayurvedic Recipes , cilantro , cooling , diet , Recipes , summer
Summer Ayurveda - Art of Living Retreat Center

Satisfying Cilantro Summer Sauce

By Diana Bellofatto
June 29, 2018

Summer Ayurveda - Art of Living Retreat Center

 

The hot time of year is upon us once again! Eating seasonally and staying cool will guide us toward lots of greens and veggies. This sauce makes the perfect partner to accompany your culinary creativity.

 

For the most part, nuts are heating, but almonds that have the skin removed are not. The skin of the almond is a tough substance to digest, and contains some anti-nutrients that are best removed. What remains is a protein-rich, ojas (think immune boosting & strengthening) enhancing, satisfying food.

 

In the world of Ayurveda, cilantro is known for it’s cooling effects and ability to cloy toxins from the body. It has an affinity for the skin and can even be made into a paste and applied to skin eruptions from rashes due to allergic reactions from poison ivy and the like.

 

Lime helps to impart the salty taste without creating excess heat, so you won’t have to add much salt to this sauce.

You can whip this sauce up in just a few minutes in a blender or food processor. Enjoy!

 

Fresh cilantro and almond sauce

If your agni (digestive fire) is up to the task of digesting raw veggies, this sauce can double as a dip for crudités or as salad dressing. Otherwise, it dresses cooked vegetables and grains very nicely.

 

  • 1/2 cup almonds, soaked over night in a bowl and peeled
  • About 1/2 cup water
  • 1 bunch fresh cilantro
  • 1/4-1/2 cup lime juice
  • About 3 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • Pink Himalayan salt & black pepper to taste

 

Directions

1. Place soaked and peeled almonds in a blender with ½ c. water, lime juice, olive oil, pepper and salt. Puree.
2. Add cilantro (leaves & stems) and blend well.
3. Add more/less water and/or oil for desired consistency.
Store in the fridge for up to 48 hours.

Makes about one cup.

 


Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: Ayurveda , Ayurvedic Recipes , cilantro , cooling , diet , Recipes , summer
Summer Ayurveda - Art of Living Retreat Center

Stay Cool with these Summer Ayurveda Tips

By Diana Bellofatto
June 20, 2018

Summer Ayurveda - Art of Living Retreat Center

 

Like the changing tides of the ocean, the practice of Ayurveda encourages us to go with the ebbs and flows of the seasons. Ayurvedic wisdom has recommendations to help us maintain balance of body, mind, and spirit. These measures can be very simple but have profound results.

 

Reaching an imbalanced state from an over abundance of heat can make manifest a host of uncomfortable side effects. In summer you may feel irritable, judgmental, argumentative, have dry skin or skin eruptions, and experience diarrhea. These discomforts can be ameliorated or avoided altogether with these summer Ayurveda tips!

 

Avoid sun

Avoid being out in the midday sun. If you go outside to exercise, try to do it in the early morning or evening. Bathing by the light of the moon instead of the sun is preferred and wear sunglasses even if you are only going out for a few minutes.

 

Wear the right colors

Colors effect our moods and body temperature. If someone says something that makes us angry we might say, “That made me see red!”. The color red stimulates and can incite, thereby increasing heat so, steer toward cooling colors in your summer wardrobe with whites and pastels.

 

Massage yourself with cooling oil

When overheated, we sweat and can experience dry skin. Massaging the body with coconut oil can cool and moisturize. Coconut oil also has the ability to kill odor causing bacteria. Always choose high quality, unrefined, organic oils. “Keep your cool” by massaging your scalp and feet with bhringaraj oil at bedtime.

 

Know your dosha

Those of us with a predominance of fire element (pitta) in our bodies can tend toward being more intense and driven to succeed. Intensity and drive serve a purpose but when pushed to extremes (such as in a competitive nature while playing a sport in the hot sun) are the same qualities that can burn us out physically, mentally, and emotionally.

 

Ayurveda calls the passionate, energetic, movement oriented qualities of pitta, rajas. Rajasic qualities are necessary in our lives and must be kept in balance. You may notice that people who are predominant in these qualities can also have sharp mental acuity. Out of balance, rajas can damage the myelin sheath that protects the brain.

 

Exercise smart

When you practice yoga, favor a practice with moderate intensity and maintain a diffusive gaze (not sharp and penetrating). Exercise by swimming or walking in shaded areas instead of playing competitive sports.

 

Know your triggers

Avoid “heated” debates and “hot” topics that you know tend to rile you up. Meditating on the bija mantras (seed sounds) Shim (pronounced “sheem”) or Aim (pronounced “I’m”) can cool and clear the mind. A longer mantra is: Lokah Samastah Sukinoh Bhavantu (May all being be happy and free). This mantra promotes kindness and acceptance.

 

May you be happy and free!

 


Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: Ayurveda , cooling , doshas , seasonal living , summer
Ayurvedic Recipes: Beet Kale Salad

Ayurvedic Recipes: Beet & Kale Salad

By Diana Bellofatto
May 28, 2018

Ayurvedic Recipes: Beet Kale Salad

‘Beet’ the heat and build your blood

Ayurveda tells us that we begin to accumulate heat in the body just prior to the summer, so we want to stay ahead of the game by paying attention to the qualities of foods that can help us maintain balance.

 

Beets are nourishing for the liver. Cooked beets cool and cleanse the blood, strengthen the eyesight, and improve anemia, therefore increasing stamina by bringing more oxygen to the blood cells.

 

Kale is cooling as well. The fiber in kale prompts healthy elimination, while the bitter taste of kale and beets stimulate the flow of bile. This helps keep the gallbladder and liver from becoming congested. As the bile flows, it flushes toxins from the body and encourages healthy lymphatic flow, which detoxifies the body and fortifies immunity.

 

This recipe is proof that eating Ayurvedically does not require time-consuming cooking methods or obscure ingredients. The ease with which this salad can be prepared is very supportive to our modern lifestyles.

 

Beet & kale salad

  • 1/2 cup grated carrots, steamed until soft
  • 1 1/2 cups grated beets, steamed until soft
  • 1 head of kale, chopped, with spines removed and discarded, steamed until soft
  • 1/2 cup shredded coconut, toasted or raw
  • 1/2 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 cup flax seed oil
  • mineral salt to taste
  • large handful of chopped cilantro

 

Directions

1. Toss all ingredients together, and voilà, you’re done! You can’t ‘beet’ this for a fast, fresh salad that you can enjoy at home or take on a picnic.

Serves 4

 


 

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TAGS: Ayurveda , Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , beet , healthy diet , healthy eating , kale , organic food , salad , summer
Ayurvedic Recipes: Collard Greens

Ayurvedic Recipes: Collard Wraps

By Diana Bellofatto
May 2, 2018

Ayurvedic Recipes: Collard Greens

 

Ready, Set, Spring!

When it comes to eating seasonally, green means go at this time of year! Verdant veggies vie for our attention as they burst up through the earth’s floor, beckoning us to savor their flavor.

 

If you follow Mother Nature’s lead, she signals us to leave behind the heavier, heating, acid-forming foods of winter that kept us warm, and asks us to focus our attention on the lighter, cooling, alkaline foods that help us to maintain balance as the season shifts and heats up.

 

Collard greens are the perfect host for the abundance of veggies that grow at this time of the year. Spices and the friendly bacteria on vegetables enkindle agni (digestive fire), and enhance assimilation and absorption of nutrients.

 

In this recipe, explore how the bitter, astringent, and pungent flavors of broccoli, radish, scallion, avocado, and cilantro team up with just enough of the sweet, sour, and salty tastes of lime and coconut to tantalize our taste buds.

 

Collard Wraps

  • 4 or more large collard green leaves
  • 1 very ripe avocado, mashed
  • 1 cup finely chopped broccoli
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped scallions
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced or minced radish
  • A generous handful of cilantro leaves
  • 1/2 cup toasted pumpkin or sunflower seeds, or 1/4 each
  • 2 tablespoons shredded unsweetened coconut
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 3 tablespoons toasted sesame or olive oil
  • Himalayan pink salt to taste
  • 2 teaspoons garam masala
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground fenugreek
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric

*If you are experiencing feelings of heaviness, bloating, and lethargy (kapha dosha), use less avocado, seeds, coconut, and sesame oil.

 

Directions

1. At room temperature, combine all ingredients (except the collard green leaves) in a large bowl and mix well.

2. Lay the collard leaves out flat, and then spoon and spread some of the mixture evenly onto each of the leaves. Wrap them up and you’re ready to roll!

Serves 4.

 


 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: Ayurvedic diet , clean eating , collard wraps , diet , greens , seasonal eating , seasonal food , Spring
Ayurvedic Recipes: Broccoli

Ayurvedic Recipes: Broccoli with Peppers and Herbs

By Diana Bellofatto
April 3, 2018

Ayurvedic Recipes: Broccoli

 

What’s in your garden?

Spring is here, and what better way to celebrate than by reaping the benefits of an herb garden!

 

If you tend towards a vata tummy (gas/bloating) when it comes to broccoli, you’ll be happy to know that the warming herbs and ginger in this recipe will aid in digestion.

 

The herbs in this recipe have an affinity for helping to balance kapha (earth & water), which is abundant during spring. They are warming and stimulating, diaphoretic, nervine, and they improve memory and relieve depression, congestion, asthma, and insomnia.

 

You can enjoy plucking this mélange of herbs for the recipe if you do have an herb garden. It’s a great way to connect more deeply to your food and the earth. If you don’t have access to fresh herbs at this time, you may substitute about half the amount of dried herbs for this recipe.

 

Broccoli with peppers & herbs

  • 2 tablespoons ghee
  • 1/2 tablespoon minced ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh minced rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
  • 1 red bell pepper, cut into strips
  • 5 cups broccoli florets
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
  • mineral salt to taste
  • black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons to 1 tablespoon of lemon or lime juice
  • * Optional – toss in toasted nuts or seeds at the end for added protein.

Directions

1. Heat the ghee in a pan. Add the rosemary and ginger and sauté over low heat until the ginger is soft and slightly browned. If you are using dried herbs, sauté them at this time as well.
2. Add the broccoli and bell pepper, sprinkle lightly with salt.
3. Stir, cover, and sauté on low to medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender. You can add a little bit of water to the vegetables if they start to stick to the pan.
4. Turn off the heat, stir in all of the other herbs. Add the lemon or lime juice.
5. Sprinkle with toasted nuts or seeds of your choice.

Serves 4 to 6. 

 


 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: Ayurvedic Recipes , broccoli , health , healthy diet , healthy eating , herbs
Ayurvedic Recipes - Sauteed Greens

Ayurvedic Recipes: Sauteed Greens

By Diana Bellofatto
February 22, 2018

Ayurvedic Recipes - Sauteed Greens

Ayurveda calls collard greens sattvic.  This implies that they support peacefulness and purity of body, mind, and spirit. Collard greens possess bitter, astringent, light, dry qualities.  Their digestion is aided with spices, healthy fats, and substances rich in digestive enzymes and stomach acid boosting abilities.

 

Enjoy collards as a side dish, a main dish with protein rich nuts, seeds, and beans or, in a soup. Read on to discover more about the greatness of these greens and the ingredients by which they are accompanied in February’s recipe.

The ‘personality traits’ of the ingredients

  • Collards Greens are packed with fiber and are an excellent source of antioxidants, vitamins A , C, E,  K, folic acid, iron, calcium, magnesium.  Their bitter taste aids in de-stagnation of the liver and enhances bile flow.
  • Tamari contains digestive enzymes and provides that “umami” taste.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar will give your stomach acid a boost and supports healthy blood sugar.
  • Ginger enkindles the digestion fire, keeps us warm, and detoxifies unhealthy fat from the body.
  • Ghee-the butyric acid in ghee nourishes the gut and provides a great source of healthy fat.
  • Pumpkin & Sunflower Seeds provide protein, are mineral rich and protect against free radicals.

Sauteed Greens with Pumpkin & Sunflower Seeds

  • 1 cup water
  • About 10 cups washed, dried, and chopped fresh collard greens
  • 2 teaspoons fresh chopped ginger
  • 1.5 tablespoon ghee
  • 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon tamari
  • 1/4 c. toasted sunflower seeds
  • 1/4 c. toasted pumpkin seeds

Directions

1. In a large deep skillet, on medium heat, sauté the ginger until soft and slightly golden.

2. Add the collard greens and mix well.

3. Add the water, cover and reduce the heat to low and cook until the collard greens are tender.

4. Turn off the heat and stir in the tamari and raw apple cider vinegar.

5. Transfer to serving bowl and stir in the sunflower and pumpkin seeds.

Serves 4

 


 

Interested in learning more about Ayurveda and the programs at the Art of Living Retreat Center? Check out our annual catalog here!

 

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TAGS: art of living , art of living retreat center , Ayurveda , ayurveda cleanse , ayurveda detox , Ayurvedic diet , Ayurvedic Recipes , cleanse , greens , sauteed greens , winter

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